Free Things to do on a Sunday


Free Activities & Free Attractions:

Buddhist Temples in Singapore


Charity-, Non Profit Organisations & NGOs in Singapore


Churches in Singapore


Hindu Temples in Singapore 


Heritage Roads in Singapore


Mosques in Singapore


National Monuments in Singapore


Synagoges in Singapore


Arts & Cultures:

An Old New World: Digital Edition

The exhibition offers two modes of navigation – guided and self-exploratory.

In the former, you will be taken on a specially curated exploration of featured artefacts and the surrounding showcases while listening to narrations by Curators Daniel Tham and Iskander Mydin, along with the themes of Knowledge and Power and Seeing the Indigenous.

Ongoing | Free Admission | 93 Stamford Road Singapore, Singapore 178897

An additional transcript function provides the tour script via a button on the bottom right-hand side, enabling persons with hearing disabilities to access the tours. Alternatively, you may also navigate the galleries at your own pace via the self-exploratory mode.

CLICK HERE TO ENJOY AN OLD NEW WORLD: DIGITAL EDITION!

The educator’s commentary for lower secondary students will also be added at a later stage.

Featuring artefact highlights, the commentary complements the museum’s educational resource An Old New World: Investigating Singapore’s History from Pre-Colonial to the Present released earlier in conjunction with the physical exhibition, for students to delve deeper into pre-colonial Singapore as they conduct their historical investigation of that period.

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An Unnatural History at Singapore Art Museum

The Singapore Art Museum at 8Q resides in the former Catholic High School. This site-specific mural draws on imagination and heritage to question the histories surrounding the area, and reflect on the museum’s role as a re-teller of official narratives.

An Unnatural History explores the struggle between man and nature within the heart of Singapore, the world’s greenest city. The mural is complemented by a website, an ever-growing, living archive with contributions from local interest groups and experts. The dialogue between the mural and website serves to expand the exchange of knowledge.

18 December 2020 - 6 June 2021 | Hoarding around SAM's building on 8 Queen Street | Free public outdoor works. Accessible at all times.

The work is a combination of Darel Seow’s passion for natural history and storytelling, and Lee Xin Li’s interest in heritage and architecture. By capturing Singapore’s cultural and natural history, the work challenges the viewer to consider what heritage means to them and to question the authenticity of the presentation in front of them.


About the Artists

Darel Seow (b. 1989, Singapore) is a visual storyteller who illustrates tales of the natural world with his unique brand of wry wit and whimsy. The illustration graduate from Central Saint Martins believes in using storytelling as a means of engagement to create experiences that simultaneously excite and educate. He has worked with the British Museum (London), National Museum of Singapore, Asian Civilisations Museum (Singapore) and other cultural institutions on projects that encourage learning through the power of imagination and play.

Lee Xin Li (b. 1988, Singapore) is an independent illustrator. Based in Singapore, Lee finds inspiration in the environment he grew up in, drawing on culture, food, architecture and history. An architecture graduate from the National University of Singapore, his love for the comic series The Adventures of Tin Tin by Hergé and Guy Delisle’s travel chronicles motivated him to begin drawing in 2013. His notable works include the Kueh series and Peta Singapura.


 Art at The Gardens


 Artisan's Garden


Art Retreat


Baba House


CDL Green Gallery


Chance Encounters

Consistent with Yeo Shih Yun’s long-standing fascination with spontaneous gestures, random occurrences, and use of unconventional tools, the seven ink drawings in Chance Encounters were created according to a set of rules devised by the artist.

Friday – Sunday | 22 January – 4 April 2021 | All Day | Esplanade Tunnel | Free Admission

With the use of dice, “answers” were obtained as Yeo responded to music composed and performed by collaborating musician Calista Liaw, determining the process and methodology of mark-making.

Both Yeo’s ink experimentations and Liaw’s erhu arrangements drew inspiration from the inventive compositions and unorthodox ideas of chance found in the works of artist and composer John Cage. Referencing Cage’s compositional process in Music of Changes (1951), which involved chance operations with the I-Ching, Chance Encounters similarly embraces the incidental through Yeo’s playful and unconventional experimentation with ink.


About the artist

The multi-disciplinary practice of Yeo Shih Yun (b.1976, Singapore) is premised upon her interest in ink, which unfurls through unconstrained experimentation with the medium. She works with an ever-growing array of tools and materials while employing various methodologies to create spontaneous arrangements that reinterpret the art of ink painting. Yeo has participated in numerous group exhibitions in Singapore and abroad.

In 2018, she presented the solo exhibition Diaries, Marking Time, and Other Preoccupations at NUS Museum. In 2020, she created a commission for Art Playscape, Keppel Centre for Art Education, National Gallery Singapore. Yeo is also Director of INSTINC, an independent artist-run space in Singapore.


Discovering Chinese Singapore Culture

Chinese culture in Singapore has evolved in a way unlike other communities around the world.

Singapore is a tiny Southeast Asian nation-state located in a region with many ethnic groups, of which the Chinese comprise only a small percentage of the overall population. However, the Chinese form the majority in Singapore, living alongside a significant proportion of non-Chinese residents.

Daily | 10 am - 8 pm | Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre @Kwan Im Thong Hood Cho Temple Gallery, Level 2 | Free Admission

Over many years, interaction with other cultures, encouraged by geographical proximity and social diversity, has birthed a Chinese Singaporean identity that is complex and ever-changing. At the Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre, join in the conversation and discover (or rediscover) what it means to be a Chinese Singapo人.


Zone 1: What Makes Us, “Us”?

What shaped Chinese Singaporean culture? Was it influenced by our strategic location as a prominent Southeast Asian port? Determined by our past as a British Colony? Or steered by the policies of independent Singapore? Take a trip to find out how geography, economics and politics had a hand in crafting our present-day Chinese Singaporean identity.


Zone 2: Beyond Generations

Seemingly ordinary habits form the “Chinese culture”, a way of life that is passed down through the centuries. That’s how inventions such as the compass and paper, wisdom from thinkers of the old like Confucius, commonly shared values of Chinese culture and tradition have been passed on through the centuries. Peep through windows and open doors for a surprise!


Zone 3: When Cultures Meet?

How many languages do you use to order a kopi-c kosong peng? The answer: three! When early Chinese migrants first arrived in Singapore, the members of different dialect groups interacted with each other and other non-Chinese residents. The result: terms invented in Singapore, delicious local cuisine and a set of customs unique to their new home. Stop by the interactive kopi-making game and the food projection table to learn more about the results of these exchanges.


Zone 4: Made in Singapore

What happens when you rapidly expose a group of people to a different set of ideas, languages, and religions? You get a community who remain rooted in their heritage but are shaped by multicultural worldviews. Like many other ethnic groups in Singapore, the Chinese Singaporeans developed unique, imaginative perspectives, unbound to one way of thinking. See how the impact of these influences are observed in food, art and popular culture.


Zone 5: Making Our Mark

Within a remarkably short time, Chinese Singaporean food, culture and products have travelled the world. Perhaps you’ve heard JJ Lin’s songs in China or visited the Old Chang Kee in London for a Hainanese curry puff. If all the world’s a lazy susan, the next generation of Singaporeans await to serve the international audience music, plays, books, television, films… Enter this futuristic zone and watch a conveyor belt transport familiar brands and individuals around you.


Zone T: The Story So Far

We’ve come a long way from a rainforest-covered, seaport to glittering concrete jungle. Spend a moment to look back on our key milestones via the interactive digital timeline. As you pore over our rich heritage, wonder, “What comes next?”


Visits for the Public

Opening Hours (Including public holidays)
Monday: 2 pm – 8 pm | Tuesday - Sunday: 10 am – 8 pm
*Extended opening hours until 9 pm from 22 January to 28 March 2021

Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre Kwan Im Thong Hood Cho Temple Gallery, Level 2. No registration required.

Free Guided Tours
English tour: 3 pm (Saturday and Sunday)
Mandarin tour: 4 pm (Saturday and Sunday)
The tours are offered on a first-come-first-serve basis. Visitors can walk-in and register at the registration desk on Level 2. Each tour is limited to 16 participants (excluding the docent) due to safe management measures.


COVID-19 measures

Current measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 requires us to limit the number of visitors in the building at any given time. Due to the current COVID-19 situation, please adhere to the following safe management measures when visiting our premises:

*Tour participants should use hand sanitizers or wash their hands with soap and water before the start of the tour.
*Each group must maintain a one-meter distance from other groups. There should be no mingling across groups.
*Masks must always be worn.

If you would like to arrange for a group visit or guided tour, find out more here.


Diver(sea)ty

In his practice, the works of Mulyana are driven by global and environmental crises, articulating his concerns with daily life and current issues.

Friday – Sunday | 11 December 2020 – 2 May 2021 | All-day | Esplanade Concourse | Free Admission

Diver(sea)ty is Mulyana’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic and the impact it has had on the world, drawing attention to the ever-more urgent need of embracing diversity and respecting each other regardless of racial, religious, socioeconomic, and geographical differences. In this installation, the Mogus—Mulyana’s octopus monster alter-ego—rallies together the underwater community in a concerted effort to aspire to greater harmony and mutual respect.

A thriving and dynamic ocean ecosystem comes to life through a series of Mogus, various marine creatures and coral islands, all carefully crafted out of crochet. By drawing us into their underwater world, these creatures in their fluidity of forms and identities prompt reflections on issues of diversity and inclusion, as well as our roles as custodians who share a collective responsibility towards looking after the earth and its resources.


About the Artist

Mulyana (b.1984, Indonesia) is known for his textile installations as well as crocheted and knitted marine worlds that are homes for his alter-ego, an octopus called Mogus. Collaboration is central to the creation of his works, and Mulyana often works together with communities in Yogyakarta, where he is currently based.

He has participated in numerous exhibitions including Equilibrium: At the Boundary Between Human and Environment at Asia Culture Center, South Korea (2020) and Jumping The Shadow at Sapar Contemporary, USA (2020). In 2019, his work A Man, A Monster, and The Sea was presented at Orange County Museum of Art in the USA and The Goods Shed in Australia.


Free Museums in Singapore


 Home Truly

Home, Truly: Growing Up with Singapore, 1950s to the Present

The National Museum of Singapore presents Home, Truly: Growing Up With Singapore, the 1950s to the Present in collaboration with The Straits Times, as part of the newspaper’s 175th anniversary. Featuring photographs and artifacts, including those contributed by members of the public, as well as audio-visual footage, sounds, scents, and special digital features, Home Truly explores the moments and experiences in Singapore’s past and present that express our identity and collective memory as a people.

Ongoing until 29 August 2021 | 10 am - 7 pm | Exhibition Gallery, Basement Level | Free Admission

Through five key themes and using the metaphor of a home, Home Truly is presented in an intimate way that invites visitors to see themselves in the stories presented, and adopts a personal and contemplative tone to encourage visitors to reflect on what Singapore means to them as their home, and their hopes for the home we aspire to be.


Laying the Foundations

Laying The Foundations explores how nation-building looked and felt like to people on the ground, through the laying down of foundational policies in areas such as housing, economy, defense, healthcare, and infrastructure.


Moving in

Moving In features some of the common experiences and memories that breathe life and meaning into a nation, and make a house a home, such as going to school, enjoying our hawker food, or relaxing in recreation spaces.


Living Together

Living Together will unpack how Singaporeans have worked together to navigate and overcome challenges faced when living together in a shared space, as people settle into a new home.


Open Doors

Open Doors will take a look at how Singapore has been shaped by its immigrant and multicultural past through the stories of different groups of people who have made Singapore their home over the years, and their reflections on what home means to them.


Sturdy through Storms

Sturdy through Storms presents how Singapore has stood united in support and courage through the crises that challenges we have faced over the decades such as floods, the British Military Withdrawal, financial crises and SARS.


Coming Home

Home, Truly will conclude with a reflection space that invites visitors to contribute to a live collective response on what “home” means by writing or drawing on a response card, and seeing it projected on a screen. Visitors may also choose to respond via a special recording device designed for the visually impaired.


Make Yourself @ Home, Truly: Digital Companion to Home, Truly

Home, Truly: Growing Up with Singapore, 1950s to the Present is complemented by a digital companion to the exhibition, @ Home, Truly, that was launched in August 2020. @ Home, Truly features an online-exclusive story of a young girl and her grandfather through illustrations by different local artists, interspersed with archival and contemporary images, artefacts and audio-visual material. The experience includes a chatbot offering games and quizzes. The digital story is released in chapters – each spotlights a theme related to the physical exhibition.


 In Order

In Order investigates the concepts of cyclical and linear time and the notion of temporality as intrinsic to understanding life and existence.

When the COVID-19 pandemic struck and disrupted daily life, Fiona Seow began developing new routines to establish a semblance of order and to keep track of time amidst profound change. Inspired by the regularity of geometry, Seow created modular systems based on the motif of the trapezium, conceiving methodologies that respond to the nature and peculiarities of this shape.

Friday 18 December 2020 - 4 Apr 2021 | All day | Free Admission | Esplanade Theatres - Community Wall, Level 3

These habitual activities culminated in the freehand drawings and sculptural installations in this exhibition that developed from processes guided by the repetition and manipulation of these modular systems. Through explorations of the various facets of time—linear, cyclical, ritualistic, fluid and temporal—In Order also questions prevailing perceptions that the routines and habits which undergird everyday life are stable and orderly.


About the Artist

Interested in space, geometry and numbers, the works of Fiona Seow (b.1992, Singapore) unfurl through the abstraction of nature and objects. Her drawings, sculptures and installations are the outcomes of processes driven by order and repetition, and often explore notions of time, existence, labour and impermanence. Seow's works have been presented at exhibitions including Only Connect Osaka at Creative Centre Osaka (2019) and the 5th Bangkok Triennale International Print and Drawing Exhibition (2019). In 2015, she was one of the winners of the Affordable Art Fair's Young Talent Programme.


Kinetic Garden

Our Science Centre welcome begins at the Kinetic Garden.

Where you can discover the inter-relationship among forms of energy and more through interactive exhibits such as the Magic Swing, a Sundial, and a Lithophone.

Every Friday, Saturday & Sunday  | Entrance, Science Centre Singapore | 30 – 60 minutes | Free Admission

The Kinetic Garden is a unique outdoor exhibition that demonstrates certain scientific principles and phenomena that would be difficult to create in an indoor setting.


Echo

Speak into the Echo Tube and listen to the echoes! An echo is the reflected sound returning to its point of origin. Heighten the fun by speaking continuously into the Tube, which creates multiple echoes and takes time to subside.


Giant Chair

Places everyone! Position your camera at the photo spot onsite (on the yellow sticker) and be tickled by the interesting illusion of how large or small your photo subjects look seated on the two chairs! It perfectly demonstrates how our visual system relies on shortcuts and sometimes glosses over details in favor of the big picture!


Memories of Two Cities


Moving Memories

Moving Memories, 2017
Presented by the National Museum of Singapore

Moving Memories presents seven of Yip Yew Chong’s life-sized murals which seek to express the romance of “places and moments… that blend sights, sounds, smell and tastes”.

Ongoing | 10 am - 7 pm | Free Admission | LED Wall, opposite The Salon

An accountant by day, Yew Chong sees painting as a way to express himself. His murals interweave his personal memories with that of residents in Singapore and have captured the imagination of many.

Savor these moments of our tangible and intangible heritage, such as barbers in back lanes, traditional kopi-making, and roadside communal satay eating, as they come alive through animation, soundscape, and projection.


Barber

39 Everton Road | Created in September 2015

Street barbers were once commonly found in Singapore’s back alleys, offering haircuts that cost between $3 and $8 in the 21st century. They operated from their stalls, a simple set-up comprising a shelter made of tarpaulin sheet, a chair for their customers, and tools of their trade laid out on a counter.

In this mural, an elderly barber is cutting his young customer’s hair. On the shelf is a red jar of Brylcreem (a hair styling product), to be applied to the boy’s hair after the haircut to give it a smooth and shiny appearance.

This mural was one of Yew Chong’s first works based on his memories of growing up in Chinatown.


Coffee Story

29 Sultan Gate | Created in December 2015

The kopi (coffee) uncle busies himself over the stove and counter, preparing breakfasts and afternoon teas for his customers. He brews his coffee and tea using the coffee sock, and roasts coffee beans in an old drum which has darkened with black soot over time.

A whistling sound is heard as the water in the kettle comes to a boil. Slices of bread are toasted, before they are slathered with kaya (coconut jam) and butter. A hot drink, soft-boiled eggs and a plate of kaya butter toast make up a sumptuous breakfast or tea-time snack for any customer.


Pasar

Eng Watt Street Block 73 | Created in April 2016

The Pasar (“market” in Malay) refers to Tiong Bahru market. Before it was set up, hawkers plied their trades on the streets; a hawker here sells putu mayam off his bicycle. These hawkers moved into a fenced area – such as this hawker selling curry noodles and laksa from his makeshift stall – which became the market over time.

This mural holds fond memories for Yew Chong, who grew up in Chinatown and made Tiong Bahru his childhood playground. Putu mayam – an Indian snack dish made of flour, water and coconut milk and served with orange-coloured sugar – is his daughter’s and late father’s favourite dish, while laksa is Yew Chong’s favourite breakfast food.


Provision Shop

8 Spottiswoode Park Road | Created in December 2015

Provision Shop presents about 30 years of history: the sale of ice that was common in the 1950s and 1960s, as well as biscuit tins and machines used to grate coconut which were common in provision shops in the 1970s and 1980s.

Prior to the proliferation of supermarkets, provision shops catered to the people’s needs, selling a variety of goods such as dried foodstuff, sundries and kitchenware, freshly-grated coconut and ice blocks.

“Hui An” (惠安) on the shop’s signboard refers to a county in Fujian province in China, where many of the early Chinese immigrants journeyed from in the 19th century to Singapore, which is represented as “Sin Chew” (新洲) on the bamboo blind of the provision shop.


Kampung

Bungalow wall next to 450 Upper Changi Road | Created in November 2015

Within a coconut grove lives a Malay and a Chinese family side by side. The idyllic village life is captured in this mural: animals roamed freely and residents could enjoy fruits – such as durians, jackfruit and rambutans – harvested from nearby trees. The Encik enjoys a view of the kampung (“village” in Malay) with his grandson. The Chinese neighbour savours durians outside his home.

The kampung was a community space where children played together, and where residents helped and shared with each other. Such neighbourly friendliness has been captured in this mural – where the pair of women exchange fruits over pleasantries.

Visit the Growing Up gallery on level 2 of the National Museum of Singapore to learn more about life in the kampung in the 1950s and 1960s.


Satay Club and the Kampung Scene from Thian Hock Keng mural

11 Jalan Pinang (Hotel Nuve) and Thian Hock Keng rear wall along Amoy Street | Created in July 2016 and April 2017

The first Satay Club, which began in the 1940s, stood on Hoi How Road, a short road opposite the Raffles Hotel which led to the sea. Around sunset, Satay Club would come alive as stalls opened for business. Customers parked themselves around the low wooden tables that surrounded the stalls, savouring freshly-grilled satay over conversation and dipping the satay into communal pots of gravy. The satay seller would fan the fire to grill the meat, while taking orders from customers.

In the background is an idyllic kampung, with attap-roofed houses flanking a stream. This scene is reminiscent of the many kampungs that dotted the landscape around Kampung Gelam near the Kallang Basin.

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Museum from home


Mythology: The Remix

You’ve heard the stories, and you know the characters.

Now imagine.

Ongoing until 31 July 2021 | 9 am - 6 pm | Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre | Free Admission

Does Yue Lao the God of Marriage and Love, govern your Tinder swipes? Could you see Nezha fighting social injustices online?

See how twenty local artists each take on one character from Chinese mythology in this exhibition.

Artists featured: A Whispering Campaign, Anngee, Antz, arai kreva, Astrid Ana Janseon, Brenda Kay, Brian Melvin Gabrillo, Charmaine Tan, Chua Yixuen, Cyntherea, Dianna Etc, Ebao, erxinta, HelloPigu, JabaOne, Moon Malek, Paynk, Puffingmuffin, Sherwan Rozan, and Sheryo.

Curated by Kult Studio & Gallery (@kult.gallery)
Commissioned by Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre
Artist statements were edited for brevity and clarity by Kult Studio and SCCC.

All materials on this website are subjected to the Terms of Use.


About Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre (SCCC)

The Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre (SCCC) collaborates with arts and cultural groups and community partners to promote and develop local Chinese culture. By creating accessible and engaging content, we strive to nurture greater appreciation of our multi-cultural identity and sense of belonging. Opened by our Patron PM Lee Hsien Loong on 19 May 2017, our Centre located in the heart of Singapore encourages everyone to enjoy exhibitions, fairs, performances, seminars, talks, workshops and other cultural activities throughout the year.



Outbound

OUTBOUND is a new initiative that reimagines transitional spaces and key entrances at the Gallery

Through a series of unique artwork commissions, developed in collaboration with leading artists from around the world.

Ongoing (All Day) | National Gallery Singapore @Various locations | Exhibition | Free

Beginning in 2018, the inaugural season will feature commissions from artists including Jane Lee (Singapore), Gary Carsley (Australia), Jeremy Chu (Singapore), Maria Taniguchi (Philippines), and Yee I-Lann (Malaysia), amongst others. Each commission will be displayed for at least three years, acting as an artistic landmark that guides visitors through otherwise ordinary passages while highlighting features of the Gallery’s iconic architecture.

OUTBOUND provokes a reconsideration of transitional spaces as sites for critical reflection, meaningful encounters, curiosity and playfulness. It transforms spaces into platforms that generate new interpretations and narratives about the Gallery and the region, tapping into dialogues on placemaking and revivifying the relationship between artists, museums and audiences.


Learn more

Learn more about the series and the first commissioned piece, Nowhere by Jane Lee, click here

Tikar-A-Gagah

Yee I-Lann (b. 1971, Malaysia)

Supreme Court Wing, Level 1, foyer near the Holding Cells | Free

Tikar-A-Gagah is a collaboration between Yee I-Lann and indigenous weavers in Sabah, a northern Borneo state in Malaysia. One side of the mat (or tikar in Malay) was made by the Bajau Sama DiLaut communities from Semporna, and the other by the Dusun and Murut communities from Keningau. The woven mat is a utilitarian and ceremonial object found commonly across the Nusantara archipelago. When laid out, the tikar becomes a place for social gatherings; when hung, it becomes an object that triggers the recollection of histories, memories and narratives in the viewer.


Forum for Drone Speech – Singapore Simulations

Haegue Yang (b. 1971, South Korea)

City Hall Wing, Level 2, City Hall Foyer | Free

Forum for Drone Speech – Singapore Simulations is inspired by the Gallery’s architecture and its connections to Singapore’s colonial past and diasporic society. The installation alludes to European neo-classical architecture, drawing on its forms to create a conversation with the former Municipal Building (now City Hall Wing). This historic building witnessed many of the nation’s milestones, including its eventual proclamation of independence in 1965.


The Regency Made Me Blind

Gary Carsley (b. 1957, Australia)
Jeremy Chu (b. 1973, Singapore)
with a contribution from Renjie Teoh (b. 1983, Singapore)

Daily | 7 am - 7 pm | City Hall Wing, stairwell between Levels 4 and 5 | Free

This stairway “garden” is simulated via digitally composited photographs of botanical gardens with colonial origins in Hanoi, Manila, Bogor, Kuala Lumpur and Singapore. The images were superimposed on bands of colours in a pattern mimicking Regency era stripes, and printed on roller blinds, self-adhesive vinyl and more than 5,000 sheets of A4 coloured 80 gm photocopier paper. The artists then reverently applied these to the walls. This meditative labour is inspired by the meticulous gold leafing of the interiors of sacred places. It is also evoked through the Tibetan Buddhist mantras on the walls that symbolically cleanse passing visitors of negative karma.


Nowhere

Jane Lee (b. 1963, Singapore)

City Hall Wing, Level 4, City Hall Foyer (in between Level 4 Gallery and Wu Guanzhong Gallery) | Free

Jane Lee’s latest commission Nowhere extends the scope of Raw Canvas, her monumental painting installed in the staircase of the City Hall Wing. Nowhere’s location at the Level 4 Foyer, a transitional space, invites visitors to pause and step onto a reflective platform to linger upon a bench that features the same painterly treatment as Raw Canvas. In the surrounding mirror-tiled wall, they can glance upon a shimmering but fragmented reflection of Raw Canvas and themselves.


About National Gallery Singapore

National Gallery Singapore is a leading visual arts institution which oversees the world’s largest public collection of Singapore and Southeast Asian modern art. Situated at the birthplace of modern Singapore, in the heart of the Civic District, the Gallery is housed in two national monuments - City Hall and former Supreme Court - that have been beautifully restored and transformed into this exciting 64,000 square metres venue.


 Public Art at Esplanade


Red-dot-marina-bay-art-and-design-guide


SBG Heritage Museum


'Sub/merged' by Finbarr Fallon

SAM Hoarding Commission: 'Sub/merged' by Finbarr Fallon

In Sub/merged, artist Finbarr Fallon responds to the site of Singapore Art Museum, located in Singapore’s Bras Basah.Bugis Precinct. He draws inspiration from the history of the area to imagine a subterranean city of the future.

18 December 2020 - 6 June 2021 | Hoarding around SAM's building on 71 Bras Basah Road | Free Admission

The work invites us to turn our attention away from our present-day surroundings to a world where the sky is no longer the limit. This hypothetical city is a reaction to the numerous plot and development regulations in the Bras Basah. Bugis Precinct, including restrictions on building heights due to the many national monuments in the area. Sub/merged presents a thoughtful and compelling argument for developing Singapore’s underground as the next frontier for urban verticality.

Fallon builds on the network of subsurface passages and transit corridors surrounding the site of the Singapore Art Museum, many of which form Singapore’s 2nd deepest MRT station, Bras Basah. The artist has also drawn on the earlier world-building in his 2017 animated film Subterranean Singapore 2065, which proposes large scale underground living in land-scarce Singapore.


About the Artist

Finbarr Fallon (b. 1992, United Kingdom) is an architectural photographer and artist based in Singapore and the United Kingdom. Trained as an architect and a RIBA silver nominee, Fallon has received acclaim for works in various disciplines; these include the Blueprint Architecture Photography Awards 2019 (Atrium People’s Choice), Landscape Photographer of the Year 2016 (Urban – Finalist), and Infrastructure Photographer of the Year 2016 (Finalist). His works have been exhibited widely, at museums including the ArtScience Museum and National Museum of Singapore, and are regularly published in journals around the world. Fallon recently curated the group shows Transient Bodies for Singapore Art Week 2019.


The News Gallery: Beyond Headlines


The Path I Pursue by Ho Ho Ying

Driven by self-reflection, spontaneity and freedom of gesture, Ho Ho Ying championed the path towards abstraction in Singapore in the 1960s.

For over five decades, his art and writings have been integral to furthering the development and discourses of art. Ho Ho Ying: The Path I Pursue presents abstract, figurative and calligraphy paintings, along with creative calligraphy works, sketches and materials from the collection and personal archive of Ho and his family.

Friday 22 January – 4 Apr 2021 | 10 am - 8.30 pm | Free Admission | Esplanade Theatres - Jendela (Visual Arts Space)

Apart from Ho’s artistic practices, this exhibition also explores the multiple creative paths that he pursued through literary prose as well as essays on art and art criticism. As part of the exhibition, a selection of texts from the 1950s to the 1990s have been translated and made accessible in English.

By drawing connections between his works and writings, the exhibition surfaces Ho’s ethos, beliefs and motivations, offering intimate glimpses into his life, observations and explorations. At times evocative and in other instances personal and contemplative, Ho Ho Ying: The Path I Pursue reveals how the written word and art are equally significant as mediums of expression for Ho.


About the artist

Ho Ho Ying (b.1935, China) is a prominent pioneer of modern art in Singapore who co-founded the Modern Art Society Singapore in 1964. In his works, he often draws inspiration from Chinese culture, calligraphy and philosophy as well as the spontaneity of abstract expressionism. A scholar of Chinese language and literature, Ho is a prolific writer who authored numerous books, short stories and contributed to the growing parameters of critical artistic discourse in Singapore. He has also participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions in Singapore and abroad. In 2012, Ho received the Cultural Medallion for his invaluable contributions to the visual arts.


Tropics, a many (con)sequence

Tropics, a many (con)sequence locates Kent Chan’s film Seni as the exhibition’s locus, inquiring on the tropical imaginary that continues to frame aesthetics and artistic identities.

 Ongoing until, 26 June 2021 | Free with registration | NUS Museum

Converging on cinematic languages and artistic histories that purposefully use these visual tropes of jungle and frontier, the tropics are studied in relation to state demands and colonial projections of the region, further elucidating its position as site, creation, and fantasy. The artist inquires on notions of the rustic and the uncharted in his propositions on where art history and history intersect. These subjective intersections are shown where components of the film and text are extracted and distilled into distinct parts, and in how they are made to converse with other paintings created at the onset of the region’s historic decoloniality. Imagery and manifestos are prompted in the exhibition, marking the striking consequences these developments in art have had on modelling and perpetuating identities.

What does it mean to bring art from the colony to the heart of the former empire? Seni speculates on the story of Ho Kok Hoe, then president of the Singapore Art Society who brought the first exhibition of Singaporean art to Europe in 1955, intimating the region’s relationship between tropics and modernity. A narrative is sung in the film, interjected with images from the exhibition in question, Paintings by Singapore Artists (1955). Deeply rooted in Chan’s practice that displaces the frame of modernity, curatorial inferences emerge through the staging of archetypal art objects within primeval, lush settings – a site that held the fascination of colonial governance.

Embracing the filmic installation, the exhibition also bears works by pioneers of the Nanyang Style. This juxtaposition bears a two-fold interrogation: how was artistic agency exercised by those who come from this so-called tropics? How did such motivations contribute to the immortalisation of equatorial imaginations? tropics, a many (con)sequence is an attempt to define the politics of the tropics.

Exhibition brochure

About the artist

Kent Chan is an artist, filmmaker and curator based in Singapore. His practice revolves around our encounters with art, fiction and cinema that explore the links between aesthetic experience and knowledge production. He holds a particular interest in the tropical imagination, and the relationship between moving images and the modern city. The works and practices of others often form the locus of his works that have taken the form of film, text, conversations and exhibitions. Chan is currently an artist-in-residence at the Jan Van Eyck Academie.


Images:

Kent Chan, detail of Still film (2019), Silkscreen on fabric, 200cm x 300 cm. Image courtesy of the artist.
Kent Chan, Seni (2019), Three-channel video installation, wood and acrylic sheets, Video duration 00:31:0. Image courtesy of the artist.
Kent Chan, detail of Still film (2019), Silk screen on fabric, 200cm x 300 cm. Image courtesy of the artist.


Urang Banjar: Heritage and Culture of the Banjar in Singapore

Urang Banjar: Heritage and Culture of the Banjar in Singapore is the fifth installment in MHC's 'Se-Nusantara' series of community co-curated exhibitions and programs on the ethnic-cultural and diversity of the Malay community in Singapore.

This year, the exhibition focuses on the Banjarese community, or 'Urang Banjar', who are arguably the smallest group that make up the Malay community in Singapore.

Daily until 25 July 2021 | 10 am - 6 pm (Last admission: 5.30 pm) | Admission is free | Malay Heritage Centre

Many of them are able to trace the journeys of their ancestors from South Kalimantan in Singapore from the late 19th to mid-20th centuries, but also share a common ancestral language, material culture as well as a distinctive set of cultural norms and practices.

The exhibition introduces the urang Banjar as well as their culture and identity through ethnographic objects, community stories, and treasured family belongings, which showcase their strong sense of kinship, industry, and history.


My Babak’s Studio

My Babak’s Studio is inspired by sisters, Fauziah Jamal and Faridah Jamal’s fond childhood memories that were truly filled with sparkling diamonds and gems!

Their late father, Haji Ahmad Jamal whom they affectionately addressed as Babak, is a Banjarese diamond trader and jeweler. Growing up, the sisters remember watching him at work and trying their hands at designing jewelry in his office located in their home at 14 Jalan Pisang, Kampong Gelam.

Explore the studio to discover the sisters’ childhood memories and experience the work that a diamond trader and jewelry designer would do on a typical day.



Visual Art at Esplande

Across four exhibitions situated around Esplanade, discover the works of Singaporean artists Ho Ho Ying, Yeo Shih Yun and Fiona Seow alongside Indonesian artist Mulyana.

These exhibitions are undergirded by the artists' explorations of mediums and materiality, intersecting transmedia exchanges and adopting distinctive approaches to artmaking.

Ongoing until 2 May 2021 | Various Timing | Esplanade | Free Admission

By delving into the complexities of subjective experiences, the exhibitions examine the interconnections between human activity and the environment in shaping and impacting our perceptions of reality.

Ho Ho Ying: The Path I Pursue 《何和应:追逐的的路》at Jendela (Visual Arts Space) endeavours to surface the connections between the art and writing of pioneering abstract artist Ho Ho Ying, spotlighting the multiple creative routes he pursued in his unrelenting search for artistic expression. At the Esplanade Tunnel, Yeo Shih Yun presents the commissioned work Chance Encounters《偶然》, which is fuelled by random occurrences and spontaneous gestures that embrace the incidental.

Mulyana’s installation Diver(sea)ty was conceived in response to the current pandemic. By transforming the Esplanade Concourse into an underwater world, he interrogates the importance of embracing diversity and fostering mutual respect in a time of great precarity. At the Esplanade Community Wall, In Order by Fiona Seow unfurls through drawings and sculptures that explore the concepts of cyclical and linear time, informed by notions of everyday life, stability and routine.


In Order | By Fiona Seow (Singapore)

Friday, 1 January – 4 April 2021 | All day | Community Wall, Level 3

In Order investigates the concepts of cyclical and linear time and the notion of temporality as intrinsic to understanding life and existence. When the COVID-19 pandemic struck and disrupted daily life, Fiona Seow began developing new routines to establish a semblance of order and to keep track of time amidst profound change. Inspired by the regularity of geometry, Seow created modular systems based on the motif of the trapezium, conceiving methodologies that respond to the nature and peculiarities of this shape. These habitual activities culminated in the freehand drawings and sculptural installations in this exhibition that developed from processes guided by the repetition and manipulation of these modular systems. Through explorations of the various facets of time—linear, cyclical, ritualistic, fluid and temporal—In Order also questions prevailing perceptions that the routines and habits which undergird everyday life are stable and orderly.

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Diver(sea)ty | By Mulyana (Indonesia)

Friday, 1 January – 2 May 2021 | All Day | Esplanade Concourse

In his practice, the works of Mulyana are driven by global and environmental crises, articulating his concerns with daily life and current issues. Diver(sea)ty is Mulyana’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic and the impact it has had on the world, drawing attention to the ever-more urgent need of embracing diversity and respecting each other regardless of racial, religious, socioeconomic and geographical differences. In this installation, the Mogus—Mulyana’s octopus monster alter-ego—rallies together the underwater community in a concerted effort to aspire to greater harmony and mutual respect. A thriving and dynamic ocean ecosystem comes to life through a series of Mogus, various marine creatures and coral islands, all carefully crafted out of crochet. By drawing us into their underwater world, these creatures in their fluidity of forms and identities prompt reflections on issues of diversity and inclusion, as well as our roles as custodians who share a collective responsibility towards looking after the earth and its resources.

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Chance Encounters《偶然》| By Yeo Shih Yun (Singapore)

Friday, 22 January – 4 April 2021 | All Day | Esplanade Tunnel

Consistent with Yeo Shih Yun’s long-standing fascination with spontaneous gestures, random occurrences and use of unconventional tools, the six ink drawings in Chance Encounters《偶然》were created according to a set of rules devised by the artist. With the use of a dice, “answers” were obtained as Yeo responded to music composed and performed by collaborating musician Calista Liaw, determining the process and methodology of mark making. Both Yeo’s ink experimentations and Liaw’s erhu arrangements drew inspiration from the inventive compositions and unorthodox ideas of chance found in the works of artist and composer John Cage. Referencing Cage’s compositional process in Music of Changes (1951), which involved chance operations with the I-Ching, Chance Encounters 《偶然》 similarly embraces the incidental through Yeo’s playful and unconventional experimentation with ink.

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The Path I Pursue 《何和应:我追逐的路》| By Ho Ho Ying (Singapore)

Friday, 22 January – 4 April 2021 | 10 am - 8.30 pm | Jendela (Visual Arts Space)

Driven by self-reflection, spontaneity and freedom of gesture, Ho Ho Ying championed the path towards abstraction in Singapore in the 1960s. For over five decades, his art and writings have been integral to furthering the development and discourses of art. Ho Ho Ying: The Path I Pursue 《何和应:我追逐的路》presents abstract, figurative and calligraphy paintings, along with creative calligraphy works, sketches and materials from the collection and personal archive of Ho and his family. Apart from Ho’s artistic practices, this exhibition also explores the multiple creative paths that he pursued through literary prose as well as essays on art and art criticism. As part of the exhibition, a selection of texts from the 1950s to the 1990s have been translated and made accessible in English. By drawing connections between his works and writings, the exhibition surfaces Ho’s ethos, beliefs and motivations, offering intimate glimpses into his life, observations and explorations. At times evocative and in other instances personal and contemplative, Ho Ho Ying: The Path I Pursue 《何和应:我追逐的路》reveals how the written word and art are equally significant as mediums of expression for Ho.

Timing:
Monday – Friday: 11 am – 8.30 pm
Saturday, Sunday & Public Holiday: 10 am – 8.30 pm

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Visual Art at Jurong

Visual Arts at Jurong Lake Gardens: 'Gang of Four'

Wednesday, 06 January 2021 - Tuesday, 06 April 2021 | 12 pm - 12 pm | Jurong Lake Gardens @Entrance Pavilion | Free Admission

Visit Jurong Lake Gardens to view the stunning visual arts installation, 'Gang of Four', by artist Kiat.

A polyptych of four feathered creatures will be swooping down at Jurong Lake Gardens (JLG), thrilling visitors with a burst of vibrant colour.

Each portrait reflects the visual artist's illumination of each bird's scientific characteristics through artistic interpretation and rendering. Set in the park, 'Gang' of Four' is revelatory of the fluidity between art and nature.

With each of the four images depicting birds that can be found within JLG, the artwork inspires the re-discovery and appreciation of nature through the possibilities of creative interpretation.


About National Parks Board

The National Parks Board (NParks) is responsible for enhancing and managing the urban ecosystems of our City in Nature. We are the lead agency for greenery, biodiversity conservation, and wildlife and animal health, welfare and management. We are also working closely with the community to enhance the quality of our living environment.

NParks manages more than 350 parks, 3,347 hectares of nature reserves, the Singapore Botanic Gardens, Jurong Lake Gardens, Pulau Ubin and the Sisters' Islands Marine Park. Adding to this is the extensive network of Nature Ways, and the over 300 km Park Connector Network that links major parks, nature areas and residential estates island-wide. Every year, we run over 3,500 educational and outreach programmes across our various green spaces.


About Jurong Lake Gardens

Jurong Lake Gardens is Singapore’s new national gardens in the heartlands. It is a people’s garden, where spaces will be landscaped and created for families and the community to come together.

The 90-hectare Gardens comprises Lakeside Garden (formerly Jurong Lake Gardens West), Chinese and Japanese Gardens (formerly Jurong Lake Gardens Central) and Garden Promenade (formerly Jurong Lake Gardens East).

Lakeside Garden is open for visitors from end-April 2019, and Chinese Garden, Japanese Garden and Garden Promenade will be completed from 2022 onwards.


For information, please email us


Visual Notes: Actions and Imaginings

For the second phase of Visual Notes: Actions and Imaginings, the prep-room project sees a continued examination of modern/contemporary artist Jimmy Ong’s practice, delving into the liquid identities the artist and his constructed personas inhabit.

Daily until 26 June 2021 | Free admission | NUS Museum


Drawing upon the artist’s experiments in the video from the 2010s, alongside a selection of Ong’s earlier study sketches, drawings, paintings, photographs, and personal effects since the 1980s, the prep-room becomes a fluid space to consider various streams: Of the colonial histories, art histories, political histories, personal histories, and mythic narratives that surface across Ong’s works, as well as their inflections across modern and contemporary temperaments.

Visual Notes continues with the notion of the preparatory study, with permeable clusters of works that posit thematic ‘studies’ for further examination. These ‘studies’ thus serve as open modes of inquiry seeking to situate Ong’s extensive practice from the 1980s to the present within broader discursive formations. The project’s subtitle takes from art historian T. K. Sabapathy’s reading of the Sitayana works made by Ong in 2010. In noting the choice of Sita from the Ramayana as subject, Sabapathy describes how such seminal characters “represent the worlds of human aspirations, actions and imaginings.” These grand notions are both deployed and softened in Ong’s work—boundaries are liquefied from the shifting identities in Ong’s video experiments, to the dynamic, malleable forms of the artist’s charcoal drawings.


About Jimmy Ong

Jimmy Ong (b. 1964, Singapore) works with a range of media, from large-scale, figurative charcoal works on paper since his first exhibitions in Singapore during the 1980s, to more recent explorations in performance, installation, and video. His practice involves highly personal inquiries into bodily forms and queer(ed) identities, expanding into broader entanglements with regional myths, archetypes, traditions, and historical narratives. His current projects interrogate the colonial figure of Stamford Raffles within Javanese history.

After being awarded a scholarship, Ong studied art at the Centre for Creative Studies, Detroit, graduating in 1986. He later completed a certificate programme at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia in 1992. Leaving Singapore in 1996, he was based mostly in the US until moving to Yogyakarta, Indonesia in 2013, where he currently lives and works. The artist has exhibited internationally, recently presenting work in Singapore (Asian Civilisations Museum, 2019; National Gallery Singapore, 2015; NUS Museum, 2013; Singapore Tyler Print Institute, 2010), Hong Kong (Para Site, 2018), Taipei (Museum of Contemporary Art, 2017), New York (Tyler Rollins Fine Art, 2013, 2010), and Yogyakarta (Biennale Jogja XII, 2013). His works are also in the permanent collections of the NUS Museum and the National Gallery Singapore.


Collections History

NUS Museum’s interest in developing further study on Jimmy Ong’s sketches and works takes its roots with the first painting of the artist that the institutions acquired. Venus Ascending with the Moon (dated 1988) became part of the South and Southeast Asia Collection in 1999, preceding Jimmy Ong’s Chinatown Suite in 2011. This Suite contains 116 sketches from 1985–87 grouped by the artist, named for the formative years spent at his grandmother’s house and his early studio at the same address. Later in 2013, Ong loaned the Museum a shoebox of photographs and postcards documenting his travels and exhibitions from the 1980s–90s. A further loan of Amoy Suite in 2016, containing 400 items including pencil and ink sketches, watercolours, oil paintings, photographic film, and sketchbooks, among others, from 1981–2010, added to this repository of works and artist archive. The current iteration of the prep-room features pieces from the Amoy Suite interspersed with photographs from the Shoebox Collection, situating these selections in relation to a large-scale recent charcoal work on paper, Rampogan Macan (2014).0


Wartime Artists of Vietnam

Exhibition until 26 June 2021 @c - Free admission

The exhibition takes as its preamble a line from the poem A Soldier Speaks of His Generation (1973): “…our generation has never slept”. Expressing the profundity of war experience and its enduring effects on the human psyche, the phrase is an entry point from which the presentation can be read and accessed.

With focus placed on the works of eight key artists who were assigned to the front as war artists by the government in Hanoi, the term ‘wartime art’ may elicit perspectives into specific experiences of conflict, but by viewing the artist as an independent actor, the exhibition prompts questions into the agency of the artworks and narratives associated to them.

Included alongside these artworks are supporting texts and excerpts of poems and memoirs. Altogether, they further explore the significance of the individual experience, suggesting intersecting concerns, even as intentions and purposes diverge.


About the collection

This remarkable collection of 1,208 wartime artworks is one of the largest known private collection of its kind outside of Vietnam. Collected during Ambassador Dato’ N. Parameswaran’s tenure as Malaysia’s Ambassador to Vietnam from 1990 to 1993 and built chiefly around artists associated to North Vietnam, the collection comprises of 858 drawings in various media, 143 hand-painted posters, 74 printed posters, 74 woodcuts, 46 photographs and 13 paintings. This undertaking took place during the early years of Vietnam’s economic reform introduced in 1986, which coincided with a newer attention on Vietnamese art, its history and directions. Despite a burgeoning contemporary art market, Ambassador Dato’ N. Parameswaran focused on collecting artworks of the war years, which for him—through their depictions of landscapes, events, peoples, and legends—are both historically and culturally important, and they demonstrate the spirit of Vietnam being a nation tested by wars and legacies.

Wartime Artists of Vietnam will be the fourth in a series of shows drawing from this collection, which has been on long-term loan to the NUS Museum since 2015 to exhibit, research and facilitate teaching. Previous exhibitions focused on the Vietnamese perspective of history Vietnam 1954-1975 (2015-2016), the artistic training and technical mastery of the artists LINES (2016-2017), and post-war remembrance Who Wants To Remember A War? (2016-2018).


Image credit: On the March (1963), metal etching on paper, Duong Ngoc Canh, 32cm x 58cm, Edition 4/10, Collection of Dato’ N. Parameswaran


Wishful Images: When Microhistories Take Form

Wishful Images: When Microhistories Take Form

explores the impact of contemporary geopolitical realities recapitulated under the Asian Cold War through a re-historicization of the past into the present.

Daily until 25 December 2021 | Free Entry | NUS Museum

Together with five artists whose artistic practices question the governmentality between the lived and the non-living — Lucy Davis, Kao Chung-Li, Kuniyoshi Kazuo, Nguyễn Trinh Thi, and Aya Rodriguez-Izumi — Wishful Images resembles a collective attempt to relate lesser-known historical events through the persistent efforts of artists, recounted and re-articulated in various forms and mediums.

Featuring artist films, experimental animations, photographs, prints, audio, and archival documents, each artistic inquiry illuminates how Cold War politics materialize as aesthetic processes under their respective geopolitical conditions. Taking its cue from Ernst Bloch’s concept of wishful images, the exhibition examines a constellation of unrealized possibilities, in which history, images, and politics triangulate.


Image: Detail from Reproduction of a photo of timber merchant Simon Oei as a child (approx. 1974) standing in the grounds of P. Bork A/S International, Kranji, where his father Allen Oei was employed. Lucy Davis, 2014, Wood-print collage.


Family & Kids

Kids water playground at Singapore


Nature Playgarden at Hort Park


Sunday storytime at Library

Join us for a session of storytelling where we share some interesting and fun tales with children.

The National Library Board (NLB) manages a network of 27 public libraries, the National Library and the National Archives of Singapore. NLB promotes reading, learning, and information literacy by providing a trusted, accessible and globally-connected library and information service through the National Library and a comprehensive network of Public Libraries.

Every Sunday | Various Timing | Various Location | Free Admission

Cheng San Public Library | Every 3rd & 4th Sunday | 2.30 pm – 3 pm (4–6 yrs)
Tampines Regional Library | Every 2nd Sunday | 11.30 am – 12 pm (4–8 yrs) (CH)*
Woodlands Regional Library | Every 2nd & 4th Sunday | 2.30 pm – 3 pm (4–6 yrs)
Bukit Panjang Public Library | Every 2nd & 3rd Sunday | 12.30 pm – 1 pm (4–6 yrs)


Super Storytastic is full of fun.

Learn about anything under the sun. Dragons, Robots, Kittens and Whales, Mysteries, Humour and Adventure Tales!

Join our librarians in this half-hour of fun facts and stories. Get to know about awesome authors and brilliant books, you can dive into. For children aged 7 to 10.

Jurong Regional Library | Every Sunday | 12.30 pm – 1 pm


Registration is required for this program.

Please note the following:

Registration is required. Do register 1 ticket for the child and 1 ticket for the accompanying adult.
Children must be accompanied by an adult at all times.
Children must be seated at designated spots with their parents/caregivers at all times.
Arrive 10 mins before the session commences. Latecomers who arrive after 10 mins before the session commences will not be allowed entry and the seats will be released to those on the wait-list.
Children below 6 years old are strongly encouraged to wear face masks or face shields.
NLB reserves the right to deny entry to participants who do not abide by the ground rules.

Find Out More Schedule!



Recreation Spots:

 Bay East Garden


 Beaches in Singapore


Eco and Conservation in Sentosa


Free Attractions at Changi Airport


Free at Gardens by the Bay


Free things to do at Marina Bay


Free things to do in Sentosa


Free tours trails and nature walks


Healing Garden


Heritage Gardens at Gardens by the Bay


Islands of Singapore


Parks in Singapore


Picnic Spots in Singapore


Serene Garden


Singapore Botanic Gardens Seed Bank


Sun Pavilion at Gardens by the Bay


Therapeutic Gardens


THE CANYON at Gardens by the Bay


The Learning Forest


World Of Plants at Gardens by the Bay


Sports & Fitness:

Community fun daily


Hiking Trails in Singapore


Mountain Biking in Singapore


Running routes in Singapore


Sentosa's Walking Trails


Skateparks in Singapore


Weekly cycling sessions


Yoga:

Free virtual Vinyasa Yoga

Join our free live 60-minute virtual online yoga class with instructor Mia Velez!

Free Yoga Class and Yoga for Beginners online Vinyasa All Level.

Every Sunday | 12 am - 1 am | Online Event | Free Admission

Join our Live Stream Free Online Yoga Class Community!

MixPose Live Stream Online Yoga is a Livestream platform specifically devoted to yoga and fitness classes. We offer a unique AI pose-tracking technology that provides feedback to instructors and users, creating a more interactive and specialized experience for virtual yoga. We provide beginner-friendly Online Yoga and there are Free Yoga and Online Yoga classes every week!

Wellness has always been an important issue for us. COVID19 has resulted in more and more people staying home and gyms/yoga studios closing down. We want to better the experience of live stream exercising as well as tackle the growing problem of loneliness.
We are devoted to developing a yoga community and improving health, all while in the comfort of your home. As we are starting up, we have many free yoga and online yoga classes from wonderful online yoga instructors available multiple times a day. We welcome all ages and levels of experience to join - Simply sign up and join a class to start!

How to Attend Your First Free Live-Stream Yoga Class
You can officially download the MixPose Free Yoga Live Stream app via Google Play! For a more immersive experience, you have the ability to stream Free Yoga Classes MixPose via Android TV. Otherwise, we have a temporary web platform we've built at Chrome. Additionally, we have just begun iOS beta testing! It is still in its early stages, so we need your support to help us better refine our platform and your experience as we grow!
See more information about our live stream yoga platform, schedule of classes, and links to sign up for free yoga classes on the MixPose.


About the Yoga Instructor

Mia Velez entered the Integral Yoga Sangha in 2016 through the kitchen by helping to cook Thursday community lunches and silent retreat meals. In 2018 she certified as an Integral Yoga teacher to learn more of the IYI approach and be part of the lineage. Mia is a disciple of the Moy Yat Ving Tsun Kung Fu lineage and is highly influenced by her martial arts training. After completing her first 200-hour teacher training in 2008, she began to see an undeniable parallel in Yoga and Kung Fu. When she began teaching Kung Fu in 2014, she incorporated Yoga insight and principles in her classes. Her goal in teaching is to connect with the students and to facilitate a safe space for exploration and self-inquiry. Yoga and Kung Fu is integrated into her daily life as a mother, a preschool teacher, and an advocate for gender, race, and class equality through multiple non-profits groups.


Lets Stay Fit with Indian Women Association


Sunday mornings Tai Chi Journey

Begin your Tai Chi journey: An introduction to essential Tai Chi skills

Learning even basic Tai Chi skills can promote balance, calmness, and mental focus.

Every Sunday, 31 January - 28 February 2021 | 10 am - 7 pm | Online Event | Free Admission

Movement is the key to maintaining mental and physical health.

This series teaches basis Tai Chi skills as posting, walking, breathing, and hand movements.

Even outwardly simple movement when practiced correctly promote organ health, lower body strength and mental focus.

Enjoy learning at home through our lessons on Zoom.

Upon registration, you will receive a link to sign and agree to the consent form.


Read the Release of Liability form below:

I consent to voluntarily participate in Human Harmonies' and HH Internal Arts, Inc's and Quality of Life Now, LLC's (individually and collectively, the “Releasee”) class with knowledge of the danger involved and assume any and all risks of injury, death, or property damage. I acknowledge that I am physically fit to participate in Releasee’s class.

I, on behalf of myself, my heirs, next of kin, executors, administrators, and assigns, hereby release and forever discharge Releasee, their respective employees, agents, officers and members, heirs, administrators and executors from any and every claim, demand, action, right of action whatsoever, kind or nature, either in law or equity, arising from or by reason of any bodily injury or personal injuries, known or unknown, death and/or property damages resulting from, or to result from any accident which may occur as a result of my participation in martial arts instruction with Releasee, or any activities in connection with martial arts instruction with Releasee whether by negligence or not.

I further release all personnel, employees, agents, officers and members of Releasee, their heirs, administrators and executors from any and every claim, demand, action, right of action whatsoever, kind or nature, either in law or equity, arising from first aid treatment or service rendered by any personnel, employees, agents, officers and members of Releasee, to me, during participation in martial arts instruction. I consent to the Releasee using their discretion to have me transported to a medical facility, in the event of an emergency, wherein I cannot be reached.

I further state that I have carefully read the above release, and know the contents of the release, and agree to this release of my own free act.


Posted in Free, INFO Website, Maid/Helper, Permanent, Sunday | Tagged , | Posted on March 17, 2021
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